Words of exiles


“By training the mothers of tomorrow, we are fighting illiteracy”

Nasrine Nabiyar,president and founder of the Malalay-Afghanistan association for the education of women and girls, exiled in France since 1988

“I remain hopeful that the Taliban will take women’s rights into account when forming their government. For the moment, everything is still ambiguous. But if the world has changed, why not the Taliban? Many things have been learned over the past twenty years: women work and have carved out a place for themselves in Afghan society. Many of them have been trained, they have acquired an ease in their expression thanks to their courage and their struggle. Many women are now writers, journalists and parliamentarians. The latter occupy a quarter of the seats within the institution! If this stops, it will be a disaster. If I have the possibility, I will continue to come to my country to develop the open school thanks to my association (1) and the unwavering support of France. Today, 500 girls are educated there and the first batch of baccalaureate graduates came out in 2010! By training the mothers of tomorrow, we are fighting illiteracy. In fact, educated women have an important educational background which they then pass on to their own children. Access to reading and to university is essential. If the Taliban put an end to it, women will lose their place in society. “

Collected by Thérèse Thibon

—-

“Saving a person is also saving part of the Afghan culture”

Words of exiles

Farzaneh Hashemi,poet, in France since 2014

“In the eyes of the Taliban government, artists have no value, art does not exist, it is unacceptable. With every great change in the history of Afghanistan, women are the first victims. I am desperate for my country. But I am also inspired by this crisis. Art is a way to reach others by creating emotion and feelings. I want the reader of my poems to feel the fear of Afghan women when the new government takes over. In this, I bear a certain responsibility. I am, moreover, infinitely grateful to have been welcomed in France: today, the artists I have met are a great support to me, while I have no family to surround me. . These artists are strong and independent, which is very rare in Afghanistan. France is a country with an extraordinary culture. For me, welcoming migrants is necessary. Saving a person is also saving part of the culture, of the art of my country. In one of my poems I wrote: “In reality, we are all immigrants. Our real country was paradise, we were born immigrants on Earth.“Currently, these verses have a special echo. “

Collected by Thérèse Thibon

—-

“I intend to return to Afghanistan”

Words of exiles

Doctor Azadah Yacoub,40 years old, of Afghan origin, gynecologist in Beaune (Côte-d’Or)

“I have been carrying out short missions of one to two weeks in the maternity ward of the French hospital in Kabul for about ten years, as a gynecologist. I intend to return to Afghanistan even if, for the moment, we do not know what the future of the hospital will be. In the maternity ward, the team is mainly made up of women. At this time, the hospital continues to operate and my colleagues are still going to work. There are obviously fewer patients given the security concerns in the city, people limit trips to urgent operations. In my family, one of my aunts was the head of the pediatric ward in a public hospital under the Taliban. She told me that working at that time was not a story of men or women. It was above all a story of courage. Without going into the future, I don’t think the new Taliban administration is replicating the same model as twenty years ago. Afghanistan and the Afghan population, especially in the cities, have changed. I think the Taliban have no interest in displaying, in the eyes of the international community, a formal ban on women from working. However, given the climate of insecurity, people are afraid of exposing themselves, and therefore there will be fewer girls who will go to school and fewer women who will go to work. “

Collected by Pascaline Akamba Mbono

.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *